Why Metal Stamping is Gaining Prominence

There is considerably more to metal stamping than the average person realizes.

FREMONT, CA: Metal stamping is a procedure that is rarely finished in a single step, even more so when complicated elements are involved. Even when such components appear to be somewhat simple at first glance, their manufacture almost always involves numerous phases. There are several aspects to consider when selecting a metal stamping process:

- The implications of stamping on the design's functionality
- Compliance with all industry-specific requirements
- The duration of production
- Cost-effectiveness

After design and prototyping are complete, five unique procedures typically required to complete the metal stamping needed to make specific parts are as follows:

Blanking

Blanking is always the initial stage in any metal stamping technique when it is essential, and it entails the severance of a large Blanking.

Blanking is always the initial stage in any metal stamping technique when it is essential. It entails the cutting of a vast sheet or coil of metal into smaller, more manageable pieces. Blanking is frequently required when a stamped metal object must be drawn or produced—, and a sheet or coil of metal into smaller, more manageable pieces. Blanking is commonly needed when a stamped metal object must be drawn or produced.

Piercing

When a completed product requires holes, slots, or other cutouts, piercing is typically included in the metal stamping process. Piercing can be used in conjunction with blanking to punch the desired shapes from the sheet metal being utilized.

Drawing

The actual stamping operation is defined by the drawing in the entire metal stamping process. The fundamental shape of the part is determined when a punch forces a metal segment through a die. When the part's depth must be less than the primary opening, it is called shallow drawing; when the part's depth must be larger than the immediate opening, it is called deep drawing.

Bending

As the name implies, bending entails positioning the work-in-progress part on a specially engineered die, where a RAM pushes against the metal, imparting the desired bend. Bending is always done after sketching, as punching a piece that has been bent would nearly permanently damage the entire section.

Air bending

Air bending is performed by bending the flat surface of a part into a die that is typically V-shaped using a punch. The distance between the die and the punch generally is greater than the thickness of the metal, resulting in a bend that slightly relaxes after the item is released. Air bending requires substantially less pressure and energy than other types of bending.