What You Should Know About Metal Finishing Types

Metal finishing with brushes, unlike plating, is an efficient method for avoiding surface imperfections. These finishing machines produce a uniform, parallel grain surface texture to smooth out a product's exterior.

FREMONT, CA: The final step in the manufacturing process, metal finishing, is employed to provide aesthetics and environmental protection. For parts that must mate or seal, it is often used to minimize surface roughness beyond machining operations' capability. It also concerns metal cleaning, descaling, and deburring procedures, among other things. In a nutshell, several metal finishing processes are used for a variety of applications; some include:

Brushing/Cleaning

Metal finishing with brushes, unlike plating, is an efficient method for avoiding surface imperfections. These finishing machines produce a uniform, parallel grain surface texture to smooth out a product's exterior. To achieve, this outcome an abrasive belt or wire brush is typically used. Furthermore, the belt or brush's single path will result in slightly rounded edges perpendicular to the grain. Wire brushing is often used to remove slag from some welding procedures and scale and grit from metal surfaces before cleaning. Before plating or coating, chemical baths and acid baths are used to scrub oil residue left over from machining, forming, and other procedures.

Finishing Vibratory

Vibratory finishing machines are employed to deburr products and remove sharp edges, sprue, and so on. To produce a consistent random texture, they place parts inside a drum filled with abrasive pellets and add tumbling vibration. The machine's cycle speed and vibration magnitude are normally customizable, allowing it to handle various parts from small to large.

Blasting

Sandblasting machines, for example, are widely used in projects that need a uniform matte texture. Sandblasting (also known as bead blasting) is a high-speed process that drives sand, steel shots, metal balls, or other abrasives onto a substrate. This provides a smooth, clean product texture, which is particularly visible in soft metals. Shot peening is a blasting technique for instilling compressive stress in metal surfaces to improve fatigue resistance, stress corrosion cracking resistance, fretting resistance, and other properties. To counteract tensile stress caused during processing, the cold working phase adds compressive stress to surfaces. Burnishing is another technique for applying compressive stress to a cold-work surface to improve fatigue resistance.