How IoT Helps Improve Metal Fabrication

Most industries are regulated in some way, but manufactured goods destined for aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, and medical equipment must adhere to even higher standards

Fremont, CA: The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is a paradigm shift in the global economy. Companies of all sizes can reap the advantages of connectivity, data mobility, and process transparency with the help of big data, sensors, online dashboards, and industrial controls and monitoring.

The Internet of Things has the potential to transform metal fabrication as well. Machine shops, manufacturers, and fabricators will benefit from increased productivity, greater transparency in the manufacturing process, and smoother, more profitable operations by incorporating IoT technology.

Here are some ways incorporating the industrial IoT benefits metal fabricators:

Improved Product Quality

Most industries are regulated in some way, but manufactured goods destined for aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, and medical equipment must adhere to even higher standards.

One of the most significant advantages of Industrial IoT for metal fabrication shops is the ability to automate inspections, improve product quality, and drastically reduce defects.

When performed by human workers, manual inspections are costly, time-consuming, and prone to error. Instead, IoT sensors and machine vision platforms can provide more reliable and unbiased evaluations. They can even use advanced imaging to see beneath the surface of a product before it moves on to the next stages of distribution.

Latest Service Models

Metal fabrication companies and manufacturers of all kinds are discovering that the Internet of Things (IoT) can unlock new types of business and service models. Manufacturing-as-a-service is one of these (MaaS).

If one ships large quantities of components to customers on a regular basis, the Internet of Things allows one to reimagine one's product as a service instead. Remote monitoring of customer inventory and in-house raw material levels is enabled by digital dashboards and IoT sensors, making sure a continuous flow of supply meets demand.

Metal fabricators can also experiment with new models and revenue streams by monetizing their own data. Manufacturers can sell data and data services about the condition and performance of components in the field as their customers use them using remote sensors and after-sale monitoring.

Manufacturers may also consider a shift to manufacturing-as-a-service, which would make use of 3D printers for metalworking. The Internet of Things is spawning new communities of customers and collaborators, pooling remotely networked printers as well as sharing the means of production to assist smaller businesses in getting their ideas off the ground without significant equipment investments.