How Drones Help in Mining Operations

How Drones Help in Mining Operations

Drones are used to gather visual data on the status of potentially dangerous areas of a mine, such as high walls, crests, and within stopes, and blast sites, resulting in fewer people being exposed to those hazards.

FREMONT, CA:One of the most significant advantages of drones in mining is increased protection in many other industries where they are used. Working in the mining industry is potentially hazardous. Materials in newly excavated areas, known as stopes, can change and move, making them too risky for staff to enter; blast sites can present unpredictable conditions, making them dangerous to walk through; and even the covering of a mine can become weak if there are issues underground, possibly resulting in a sudden collapse that puts those nearby in danger. Drones, on the other hand, are helping to develop mining work in a variety of ways. Here is a rundown of all the advantages that drones bring to mining operations:

Improved Safety: Drones are used to gather visual data on the status of potentially dangerous areas of a mine, such as high walls, crests, and within stopes, and blast sites, resulting in fewer people being exposed to those hazards.

Enhanced Savings: Drones can be used to capture visual data within a stope, which can help locate residual ore and geotechnical areas of interest, potentially resulting in more revenue.

Optimized Data: Engineers and safety workers will benefit from capturing HD 4K video and high-resolution images of a mine and creating a historical record of the mine that can be used for future planning.

Greater Productivity: Mining companies may use visual data collected by drones to update stakeholders on an ongoing project's status easily.

Drones are commonly used in mining to collect raw visual data. This information can then be transformed into various formats, such as informative images, videos, 3D maps, and orthomosaics.

Here are a few ways of how these outputs are used in mining operations:

  • Mine planning.
  • Optimizing site development.
  • Blast engineering.
  • Mapping the inside of mines.
  • Environmental monitoring.
  • Stockpile inventory monitoring.