Challenges of Finishing Stainless Steel

One must take accurate steps and work their way through the grit levels of the abrasive materials they are using to finish stainless steel properly. When it comes to stainless steel finishing, no one product can do it all.

FREMONT, CA : Stainless steel is used in a variety of industries and applications, including food service, aerospace, medical, aerospace, and architectural metal fabrication, where high purity or unique aesthetic requirements are significant. Although the material is solid, long-lasting, and corrosion-resistant, it does pose some welding and finishing challenges. Here are some things to think about:

Stainless Steel Is Susceptible to Contamination

It is, in particular, more prone to pollution than carbon steel. It is crucial to maintain integrity in the weld and avoid inclusions to avoid contamination in applications where high purity is essential, and most welds are X-ray-inspected, such as medical equipment and power generation. This also applies to the finishing phase. During the finishing process, one would not wish to add contaminants that might corrode the weld or damage the joint later.

Stainless Steel Finishing Is A Multi-Step Procedure

One must take accurate steps and work their way through the grit levels of the abrasive materials they are using to finish stainless steel properly. When it comes to stainless steel finishing, no one product can do it all. It is normal to start with a bonded abrasive for heavy stock removal, blend with a flap disc, blend the parent material to the weld with a resin-fiber disc, and finish with a polishing buffing disc. While it might be tempting to cut corners to save time, doing so may lead to expensive rework if the results are not what anticipated.

Stainless Steel Is A Delicate Metal

It is easier to scratch or gouge the workpiece because it is softer than steel with higher carbon content. Take special care to avoid removing too much material, which would weaken the weld in the long run. Since stainless steel discolors with heat, applying too much pressure during grinding or finishing may cause the metal to turn purple or brown, necessitating a secondary process to remove the discoloration, which takes time and money.

Mistakes That Result in Rework and Scrap Are Costly

Reworking stainless steel can be twice as expensive as reworking carbon steel. To begin with, stainless steel is more costly than carbon steel and usually necessitates more labor. Stainless steel is less forgiving, so one will need to pay attention to the finishing process to avoid damaging the material. Since the application necessitates contaminant-free materials, abrasives used with stainless steel can be more costly.

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